Welcome to the Ostrich Inn at Newland - Tel: 01594 833260 - a lovely scenic old pub situated in Newland, a free house renowned for its excellent food with one of the best restaurants in the area, catering for a wide variety of tastes, including vegetarians.

Welcome to The Ostrich Inn - a free house renowned for excellent food with one of the best restaurants in the area which caters for a wide variety of tastes including vegetarians.

The Ostrich Inn prides itself on offering the best of local food in a warm welcoming atmosphere with the quality of the food and the menu range earning good revues from the food critics and a listing in all the leading Pub guides.

British pubs, central to British life, play a pivotal role in local communities and the Ostrich Inn is no exception, acting as a unique social centre and the focus of community life for the village.

The exact details of the inn have been lost down the ages but the thirteenth century building was originally constructed to house the workers who built the church opposite.

Pub Taste of Success for Kathryn - A Profile of Mine Host

We present a snapshot of one of our recent evenings when the locals let their hair down and the feathers flew . . .

The Ostrich Inn presents a gallimaufry of random photographs taken over the festive season and intended to give a unique view of our seasonal celebrations.

The Ostrich Inn delights in celebrating the diversity of country life with a wide range of events held over the course of any year.

To help the visitor to our area, The Ostrich Inn presents a selection of our favourite links.


Contact Us at The Ostrich Inn with all your Queries or to Reserve a Table

Click Here to Bring up a pop up window with a scaleable map showing how to find the Ostrich Inn

Send us an Email us at the Ostrich Inn, a lovely scenic old pub situated in Newland


The exact details of the inn have been lost down the ages but the thirteenth century building was originally constructed to house the workers who built the church opposite.

The Ostrich Inn - An ancient and picturesque inn

Welcome to the Ostrich Inn at Newland - Tel: 01594 833260 - a lovely scenic old pub situated in Newland, a free house renowned for its excellent food with one of the best restaurants in the area, catering for a wide variety of tastes, including vegetarians.

The Ostrich Inn can be found in the middle of Newland, a beautiful village which lies on the western edge of the Forest of Dean and adjoins the Wye Valley, both areas of outstanding natural beauty. The Forest of Dean is one of the few surviving Royal Hunting Forests with its herd of wild fallow deer and with the scars of its ancient iron ore and coal mining now largely disappeared, it offers the visitor one of the most fascinating and largely unspoilt areas in this part of the United Kingdom. Add to this the rugged beauty of the Wye Valley set on the border of England and Wales and it would be difficult to beat the scenic variety offered to our visitors.

The exact details of the inn have been lost down the ages but the thirteenth century building was originally constructed to house the workers who built the church opposite. All Saints church in Newland is known locally as the Cathedral of the Forest because of it's proportions, history and setting and was first established by Robert de Wakering (1215-1237) in the thirteenth century. During this time a tunnel was also constructed from the next door Dower (or Dark) House to link to the church.

A local traction engine calls at the traditional Ostrich Inn at Newland - Tel: 01594 833260 - a lovely scenic old pub situated in Newland, a free house renowned for its excellent food with one of the best restaurants in the area, catering for a wide variety of tastes, including vegetarians.

The Probyns were the dominant family in Newland taking over from the De Pembridges and could trace their ancestors back to the ancient territories of Wales between the 11th and 12th centuries. From very early on the Probyn family not only held lands and estates in Wales, but were also actively allied with other influential families. Family links extended into Cheshire and genealogically the Probyns were linked with the Earl of Carysfort at Elton Hall in Northampton. The Probyn Coat of Arms comprises:

A Shield with Ermine, a red horizontal stripe, on which there is a gold lion.
A Crest with an Ostrich with a key in its beak.
And the motto: Manus haec inimica tyrannis.
During the civil war the local Forest of Dean was stripped of much timber for the Siege of Gloucester, and with the local Royalist Wintours family in nearby Lydney, the area was caught up in the fighting. During this time the upper floors of the pub were burnt down and were rebuilt under the direction of the Probyns. To this day the Ostrich still retains many of it's ancient features accumulated over the centuries, including an original priest hole. And in the nearby Wye Valley on the way to Tintern, can be found the Wintours Leap overlooking a particularly steep ravine.

The area had many links to the sea and the Forest of Dean timber was used to build many a ship right up to the time of Nelson who is commemorated in nearby Monmouth. By the eighteenth century, the Probyns family were prosperous merchant shippers operating mainly out of Bristol and using the Ostrich from their crest on the prow of their ship. The pub in their home village of Newland similarly become known as the Ostrich Inn.

The area has continued to welcome visitors over the years, with the most recent invasion being an RAF second world war airbase, now long disused, which was built on the outskirts of the village.


Local traditional dance groups relax after one of their regular performances

Local traditional dance groups relax after one of their regular performances

Close to the Ostrich Inn are the old almshouses which were founded by a London haberdasher in the 1500's and also nearby stands a huge ancient oak tree with its trunk measuring 46ft in girth. All Saints church opposite the Ostrich Inn comprises a west tower and a nave with five arches, adjoining very large north and south aisles, south porch and chapels. In 1305 Edward I added a small chapel (adjoining the south porch) and founded the chantry of King Edward's Service. All the early builders of the church were important men in the affairs of the State, and this may help to explain the unusual size of the church for such a small village.

There are many interesting monuments within the church including an effigy of Jenkin Wyrall, Forester of Fee (d. 1457), which shows interesting details of hunting costumes of that period. Also within the church is an old brass engraving known as "The Miners Brass" which depicts a helmet, crest and figure of a mediaeval miner of the Forest of Dean with a hod and pick in his hand and candlestick in his mouth. This has become one of the "symbols" of the Forest of Dean and at just one foot high, has been adopted as the badge of the local Freeminer Brewery.

The village itself has origins traceable to the time of Edward I and sits below a hill which was strongly fortified by the ancient Britons and which was called Drakehord, the place of the dragon's treasure, in 1337. Some five hundred years later, the hill's name had been corrupted to Dragons Ford on the local maps of 1840. The village has remained largely untouched since then whilst the Ostrich Inn retains its old world charm complemented by warm and attentive service.

With its outstanding natural beauty and wealth of historical associations, the area remains a popular location for visitors and the Ostrich Inn provides the ideal centre from which to venture out.



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